How To Get Better Results From Your Guitar Practice

Why You Don’t Get More Results From Guitar Practice

Are you tired of practicing guitar day after day but not really getting anywhere? You’re not the only one. Tons of guitar players struggle with this same issue (and many never solve it). There are countless reasons why you might not be getting results from your practice. Below are just a few. Read through them and make the changes mentioned to start getting better results:

Not integrating skills together

Learning new things on guitar by themselves can be beneficial to a point. However, to get the very most from your practice time, learn how to combine different skills together. This helps you eliminate imbalances in your playing that prevent you from reaching your full potential or performing real music.

Here is an example of practicing something in isolation: practicing a single scale to a metronome

Here is an example of practicing this same item by integrating it with something else: practicing using a scale pattern to improvise a phrase over a backing track

While integrating your skills, you practice multiple things at once and learn how to play better in musical situations. This makes using this style a very efficient choice for your practice.

Allowing distractions to get in the way

Getting the most from guitar practice is all about the quality of your practice. When you allow yourself to become distracted by things like television, texts on your phone, podcasts or anything else, you lose focus and don’t get as much benefit as you could be getting. Practice guitar in a distraction free environment for the entire duration of your practice time and you will get much better results.

Another helpful approach is to practice in shorter bursts. In other words, make your guitar practice sessions no longer than 15-30 minutes each and spread them throughout the day (rather than practicing for hours at a time). This helps you maintain focus since a person can really only maintain total focus for a set amount of time. This helps you get the very most out of your time.

You have no strategy for reaching goals

To make guitar practice effective, you must have goals that you are working towards. Without these goals in place, your practice is unorganized. Determine your highest musical goals ahead of time, then order your practice schedule around those goals. For even better results,

Why You Don’t Get More Results From Guitar Practice

Are you tired of practicing guitar day after day but not really getting anywhere? You’re not the only one. Tons of guitar players struggle with this same issue (and many never solve it). There are countless reasons why you might not be getting results from your practice. Below are just a few. Read through them and make the changes mentioned to start getting better results:

Not integrating skills together

Learning new things on guitar by themselves can be beneficial to a point. However, to get the very most from your practice time, learn how to combine different skills together. This helps you eliminate imbalances in your playing that prevent you from reaching your full potential or performing real music.

Here is an example of practicing something in isolation: practicing a single scale to a metronome

Here is an example of practicing this same item by integrating it with something else: practicing using a scale pattern to improvise a phrase over a backing track

While integrating your skills, you practice multiple things at once and learn how to play better in musical situations. This makes using this style a very efficient choice for your practice.

Allowing distractions to get in the way

Getting the most from guitar practice is all about the quality of your practice. When you allow yourself to become distracted by things like television, texts on your phone, podcasts or anything else, you lose focus and don’t get as much benefit as you could be getting. Practice guitar in a distraction free environment for the entire duration of your practice time and you will get much better results.

Another helpful approach is to practice in shorter bursts. In other words, make your guitar practice sessions no longer than 15-30 minutes each and spread them throughout the day (rather than practicing for hours at a time). This helps you maintain focus since a person can really only maintain total focus for a set amount of time. This helps you get the very most out of your time.

You have no strategy for reaching goals

To make guitar practice effective, you must have goals that you are working towards. Without these goals in place, your practice is unorganized. Determine your highest musical goals ahead of time, then order your practice schedule around those goals. For even better results, take lessons with a guitar teacher who will help you schedule your practice in a way that leads you directly to your goals in as little time as possible.

You’re not tracking progress

Tracking your progress is essential for getting better results. How? When you track every detail of your guitar playing you are more likely to understand what is helping you improve and what is not. You also see yourself improving which has a motivating effect that helps you see your musical goals through to the end.

Tom Hess is a guitar teacher who also trains musicians on how to grow a career in the music business. He offers his advice on tracking progress: “No matter if you are a guitar player or a pro musician trying to make it, tracking your progress is critical. When you track every aspect of your journey to reach your goals, you leave no stone unturned. In the process, you learn which approaches work best to get desired results and which weaknesses need to be improved upon so they aren’t holding you back.”

Use the concepts in this article and watch as your guitar practice becomes more effective than ever!

who will help you schedule your practice in a way that leads you directly to your goals in as little time as possible.

You’re not tracking progress

Tracking your progress is essential for getting better results. How? When you track every detail of your guitar playing you are more likely to understand what is helping you improve and what is not. You also see yourself improving which has a motivating effect that helps you see your musical goals through to the end.

Tom Hess is a guitar teacher who also trains musicians on how to grow a career in the music business. He offers his advice on tracking progress: “No matter if you are a guitar player or a pro musician trying to make it, tracking your progress is critical. When you track every aspect of your journey to reach your goals, you leave no stone unturned. In the process, you learn which approaches work best to get desired results and which weaknesses need to be improved upon so they aren’t holding you back.”

Use the concepts in this article and watch as your guitar practice becomes more effective than ever!